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Symsimma

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Reply with quote  #1 
Thanks for the detailed response in my questions. I have been doing more research into the physics of movement and found that there are several things that I have overlooked. The most obivious one is inertia. To make a long story short, its a underappreciated phenomena, one masked by friction, and I know fully understand the logic behind inertial training. I presented this info to my brother, but he is not buying it. He thinks weight training is more effective because "all the top athletes weight train." But because they all do it dose not mean weight training is effective. So I did some more digging and discovered, to my surprise,that there is very little evidence to support a positive effect of weight training on performance. The proponents usually counter by saying that its not being performed correctly or with just plain ridicule. My own personal experience with weight training led me to question its utility, I only saw an improvement once, in my vertical leap, and it occured after my first session. Subsequent sessions confered no benefit. Interestingly, the largest improvements in my performance, in basketball, came during a period when I did not lift any weights at all, I just figured out how much force to use for a particular task, funny- the harder I tried to run or jump, the results were negative, when I just used enough force to get moving, the results where explosive.
That leads me to these questions:
  • What benefit dose weight training really have, how and when is it appropriate to use
  • Why is it now so pervasive with very little being said about alternatives
  • Is there anywhere in New York, I'm in Westchester County, that has an I.E. trainer, no gym has it
  • I found some other inertial training devices, namley the XCO Trainer and the I.K.E. What's you're assesment of these tools.
What you mentioned about maces is true. In just about all cutures the weights of these weapons where within the range you described. The Greek halteres weighed from 2.5-10.15 lbs. Interestingly, the description of how halteres were used is similar to Bruce Lee's straight hand lead, where you cast the fist, allow its inertia to carry you towards the target, and deliver the blow after you become grounded. People who witnessed Bruce perform this attested to its devastating speed and power. Its sounds like he was intuitively manipulating his mass according to inertial principles. Thanks again.
stevedavison

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Reply with quote  #2 

Dear Mr. Symsimma

 

"all the top athletes weight train." That’s not quite true.   ViJay Singh training is comprised of a substantial amount of Impulse Training…so also for Evander Holyfield and now retired Nolan Ryan…or even Adam Archeleta or Drew Brees.  The Last five winning pitchers of the World Series are impulse users.  I’m not gonna make a long list here…just know we are high up as the technology of choice amongst many professional and world champions.   We are now still in the classification of secret weapon amongst most of our elite users.  But the ones that let us put them on our web sited are http://www.impulsepower.com/eliteusers.htm  and as a thought neither Bo Jackson nor Hershel Walker worked out with weights (I was privileged to work with Hershel with the cowboys).

 

As far as your vertical training experience.   Your brain as a conscious control mechanism is a poor choice.   Page 4 of our clinical training manual addresses the timing of conscious thinking total time from conception of stimulus to action is 500 + milliseconds (download here http://www.impulsepower.com/manual.htm ). This is way to slow to activate fast twitch fiber.   Auto reactive control is performed by preprogrammed muscle control and is basically activated in less than 30 milliseconds and often less than 10 milliseconds…that’s the realm of fast twitch.  Get your brain out of the action and power will magically appear.   Ask your brother if he ever hit that amazing golf shot that was so easy.

 

“What benefit dose weight training really have, how and when is it appropriate to use”.

Good question.   I have no Idea.  Weight training for competition is not about what you lift but how you lift.   Fred Hatfield’s workout for the world record was with weights sometimes 30% of Max RM.   He trained technique and form first then went for the heavy stuff just every so often.  It is more about how you train for handling the inertia of the weight not the weight of the weight.

 

“Why is it now so pervasive with very little being said about alternatives”. People don’t like to change.   They can’t understand that to be better they must do something they are not already doing.   In order to change your performance one must change the training.   That’s why to top performers are top…they aren’t doing what the people they outperform are doing.

 

“Is there anywhere in New York, I'm in Westchester County, that has an I.E. trainer, no gym has it”.   The closest Dual HP to you is as the Military academy at West Point.  We do have therapy systems in the city as Columbia University’s Sports Medicine Center.

 

” I found some other inertial training devices, namely the XCO Trainer and the I.K.E. What's you're assessment of these tools”.   The XCO is an inertial exercise trainer but cannot create the forces, short time to peak force, nor frequency of our Impulse HP…this is due to the light weight of the weight in the tube and hydraulic aerodynamic constraints of travel in an enclosed cavity.   It is a good little travel workout device.  The I.K.E is a knock off of the Impulse original patent.   Many years ago we forced I.K.E. out of business on patent infringement.  Prior to that I asked them to work with us and we’d share our knowledge…they apparently thought they’re smarter than us.  Yet they ride on our research exercise programs and performance history.  When they reentered the market I realized they had no idea what they were doing and just left them go.  I don’t consider them even near a competitor.

What you said about The Greek halteres was neat to hear.  It’s thought that they trained with the heavier weight and jumped with the lighter.   They are an excellent example of inertial exercise and proof that “ain’t nothin new”.  What Bruce Lee described is what every winning sprinter does with each stride and step…use the inertia of the arm to ground the step with forces many times the sprinters weight to generate huge forward thrust.

 

Hope this helps

 

Steve

Symsimma

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks, that helps a lot. The more I dig is the more I find the very things mentioned on this forum but in different forms. Beauty of form as more important than brute strength is heavily mentioned all martial arts and dances of the world. In Chinese martial arts there is a terribly misunderstood principle called Peng. Its essentially a way to fully feel ground reaction forces and use them in high velocity maneuvers. Sadly, there is much superstition and "magic" surrounding this. My brother was never an athlete, but a recreational weight trainer. I think he just assumes too much. But I have had experiences, just fleeting though as I tend to snap into thinking too much, of tremendous power with very little effort. I once intercepted a pass in mid flight starting from a dead stop, the pass was executed near half court and I started from under the goal. The best ways to describe the feeling was floating like the ground disappeared. I have also observed that many athletes look disconcertingly relaxed while performing at tremendous levels. Jeremy Wariner, Carl Lewis, and Alyson Felix come to mind.
Thanks again.
stevedavison

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